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Archive for October, 2015

New Linux Kernel Version 4.2.5 available for download!

The new Linux Kernel Version 4.2.5 is available for download! Visit the Linux Kernel Archive here: https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/ Get the new Linux Kernel directly through this link: https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v4.x/linux-4.2.5.tar.gz NEW: See the latest FUN statistics for this Kernel version here: https://www.linuxcounter.net/statistics/kernel See how many lines of code this new version has, how many bad words or how […]

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New Linux Kernel Version 4.2.4 available for download!

The new Linux Kernel Version 4.2.4 is available for download! Visit the Linux Kernel Archive here: https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/ Get the new Linux Kernel directly through this link: https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v4.x/linux-4.2.4.tar.gz NEW: See the latest FUN statistics for this Kernel version here: https://www.linuxcounter.net/statistics/kernel See how many lines of code this new version has, how many bad words or how […]

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An Introduction to Tabled Logic Programming with Picat

Picat is a new logic-based programming language. In many ways, Picat is
similar to Prolog, especially B-Prolog, but it has functions in addition
to predicates, pattern-matching instead of unification in predicate heads,
list comprehensions and optional destructive assignment.
Knowing some Prolog helps when learning Picat but is by no means required.
more>>

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​Matthew Garrett Is Not Forking Linux

matthew-garrettBut the famed Linux developer is putting his security work into his own Linux tree without Linus Torvalds’ approval. When Matthew Garrett, well-known Linux kernel developer and ‎CoreOSprincipal security engineer, announced he was releasing a [Linux] kernel tree with patches that implement a BSD-style securelevel interface, I predicted people would say Garrett was forking Linux. I was right. They have. But, that’s not what Garrett is doing. …

He’s building his own kernel tree because “The securelevel feature is part of the work done to make Secure Boot meaningfully useful – verifying that you’re booting a signed kernel isn’t terribly useful if it’s then straightforward for that kernel to be modified at runtime.”

Read more at ZDNet Linux and Open Source

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LinuxCon 2015 Report: Dirk Hohndel Chats with Linus Torvalds

LinuxConFor many LinuxCon attendees, one of the biggest event highlights is the opportunity to rub elbows with the people who actually write the Linux code. The only thing that can top that? Hearing from Linus Torvalds himself, the man who created it 24 years ago and still writes the code to this day.

At this year’s LinuxCon 2015 fireside chat, Linus sat down with Dirk Hohndel, Chief Linux and Open Source Technologist at Intel, to talk about everything from Linux containers to Dublin bus drivers. Here are a few of his most memorable comments from the discussion.

On kernel security:

I’m sure we could do better, but we have a fair amount of tools to do static checking for common patterns–and we haven’t had anyone say this is unfixable, rewrite it all. Don’t get me wrong, security people will always be unhappy. But the kernel poses special challenges, because any bug can be a security bug. We also have to keep in mind that most of the kernel is drivers, a big chunk of the rest is architecture specific, and there are 25 million lines of code. So it’s really hard to have people go over it; we have to rely on automated testing and on tools. There are too many lines in too many obscure places for humans to really check.

linuxcon-dublin-linus-chat

On containers:

I enjoy all the buzzwords. And I enjoy not having to care.

On maintainer teams:

We’re getting lots of contributors, but we have more trouble finding maintainers. Probably because the maintainer’s job is to read emails seven days a week. Forever. That’s why we’re pushing for maintainer teams as much as possible. It lessens the steps to becoming a maintainer if you’re not the only one.

On ARM architecture:

I’m happy to see that ARM is making progress. One of these days, I will actually have a machine with ARM. They said it would be this year, but maybe it’ll be next year. 2016 will be the year of the ARM laptop.

On Dublin bus drivers:

They’re coming at you from the wrong side of the road. They’re trying to kill you! If I can survive this trip, I think I can make it a few more years.

On user space versus kernel space:

For a long time, I’ve said that user space should be the most interesting thing. The kernel is just the infrastructure, the roadway. And who’s really interested in the tarmac? It’s only odd and dysfunctional people like me. I’m perfectly happy doing infrastructure, but I’m always surprised that others are interested in it.

On the next Linus project:

I’d hate for there to have to be a next Linus project. When I created Linux and Git, I was in a situation where no one else was providing what I needed. I don’t want to be in that situation again; I’d much rather coast along and be lazy. Anytime I need to start a new project, that’s a failure for the rest of the world.

On the next 25 years of Linux:

Linux did everything I expected it to do in the first six months, everything that came after was about other people solving new and interesting problems. Linux is all these crazy people doing crazy things I never imagined. It’s going to be interesting to see what others will do with it in the next 25 years.

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The Linux Foundation Announces Project to Advance Real-Time Linux

logo lf newThe Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux and collaborative development, today announced the new Real-Time Linux (RTL) Collaborative Project. RTL will bring together industry leaders and experts to advance and maximize technologies for the robotics, telecom, manufacturing, aviation and medical industries, among others.

The RTL kernel supports the largest range of architectures of any operating system and can leverage Linux device drivers, file systems and more from the mainline kernel. Real-time properties make it possible to control robots, data acquisition systems, manufacturing plants and other time-sensitive instruments and machines from RTL applications. It provides the critical infrastructure for some of the world’s most complex computing systems.

RTL’s Thomas Gleixner, who has been maintaining the RTL branch for more than a decade, will become a Linux Foundation Fellow to dedicate even more time to his work on RTL. He joins other Linux Foundation Fellows, including Linux kernel stable maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman, embedded Linux developer, and Yocto Project maintainer Richard Purdie and Linux creator Linus Torvalds…

Read more at Linux Foundation

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New Linux Kernel Version 4.2.3 available for download!

The new Linux Kernel Version 4.2.3 is available for download! Visit the Linux Kernel Archive here: https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/ Get the new Linux Kernel directly through this link: https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v4.x/linux-4.2.3.tar.gz NEW: See the latest FUN statistics for this Kernel version here: https://www.linuxcounter.net/statistics/kernel See how many lines of code this new version has, how many bad words or how […]

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