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Category: Security

Transferring Conserver Logs to Elasticsearch

If your organization manages Linux, AIX, HP-UX or Solaris servers
in-house, chances are your system administrators at least
occasionally need low-level access to those devices. Typically,
administrators use some kind of serial console—for example, traditional
serial port, Serial-over-LAN or Intelligent Platform Management Interface
(IPMI). more>>

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Securi-Pi: Using the Raspberry Pi as a Secure Landing Point

Like many LJ readers these days, I’ve been leading a bit of a
techno-nomadic lifestyle as of the past few years—jumping from network
to network, access point to access point, as I bounce around the real
world while maintaining my connection to the Internet and other networks I
use on a daily basis. more>>

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Hacking a Safe with Bash

Through the years, I have settled on maintaining my sensitive data in
plain-text
files that I then encrypt asymmetrically. Although I take care to harden my
system and encrypt partitions with LUKS wherever possible, I want to secure my
most important data using higher-level tools, thereby lessening dependence on
the underlying system configuration. more>>

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Secure Server Deployments in Hostile Territory

Would you change what you said on the phone, if you knew someone malicious was listening?
Whether or not you view the NSA as malicious, I imagine that after reading the NSA coverage on
Linux Journal, some of you found yourselves modifying your behavior. The same thing
happened to me when I started deploying servers into a public cloud (EC2 in my case).
more>>

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Flexible Access Control with Squid Proxy

Large enterprises and nuclear laboratories aren’t the only organizations
that need an Internet access policy and a means of enforcing it. My
household has an Internet access policy, and the technique I’ve used to
enforce it is applicable to almost any organization. In our case, I’m not
too concerned about outside security threats. more>>

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Security in Three Ds: Detect, Decide and Deny

Whenever a server is accessible via the Internet, it’s a safe bet that
hackers will be trying to access it. Just look at the SSH logs
for any server you use, and you’ll surely find lots of “authentication
failure” lines, originating from IPs that have nothing to do with you
or your business. more>>

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Real-Time Rogue Wireless Access Point Detection with the Raspberry Pi

Years ago, I worked for an automotive IT provider, and occasionally we went
out to the plants to search for rogue Wireless Access Points (WAPs). A
rogue WAP is one that the company hasn’t approved to be there. So if
someone were to go and buy a wireless router, and plug it in to the
network, that would be a rogue WAP. more>>

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